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    FRANK LEO & ASSOCIATES

    #1 RE/MAX TEAM IN TORONTO & THE GTA**

    7 ways to Improve the Air Quality in your Home

    To improve the air quality in your home, it’s best to approach from all angles. Though you can’t control what comes out of your heater, here are several ways you can take care of what goes into your home.

    • Choose your filter carefully

    An air filter is a great way to improve your home’s air quality. However, not all filters are created equal. Look for high-quality HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) or ULPA (ultra-low penetration air) filtration that will last for several months without the need for replacement parts. It pays to look for an air filter that’s easy to maintain and replace. Also, look for a system that will protect you from the various particles in your home – not just dust and allergens. Some systems provide protection from smoke or even mold spores.

    • Choose the right size

    Just as you need to find an air filter that’s the proper fit for your home, you’ll also have to consider size when you choose where to install it. Bigger is not always better – too large of a unit can create excess noise. On the other hand, if there isn’t enough space, your filter may not work properly or even damage your home.

    • Check the price

    Once you’ve found an air filter that fits your needs, compare prices from several different retailers to find the lowest price without sacrificing quality. Make sure you look for a reasonable warranty and any available return policies in case your unit malfunctions during use. If you

    • Choose chemical-free cleaners

    Cleaning supplies such as dish soap and laundry detergent can affect your home’s air quality. When you use chemical-based cleaners, not only will they leave behind a strong scent that may cause irritation to anyone in the house with allergies or asthma, but they’ll also pollute your indoor air when you breathe them in while cleaning. Look for natural, chemical-free cleaners that include natural ingredients from plants and minerals.

    • Make a fresh start with air fresheners

    Another household product you should consider is an air fresher. The chemicals in many common air fresheners can pollute your home’s air quality, particularly when used around pets or small children. For healthier alternatives

    Most conventional household cleaning supplies contain chemicals that can pollute your indoor air quality. When you use chemical-based cleaners, not only will they leave behind a strong scent that may cause irritation to anyone in the house with allergies or asthma, but they’ll also pollute your indoor air when you breathe them in while cleaning. Look for natural, chemical-free cleaners that include natural ingredients from plants and minerals.

    • Choose healthy oils

    When you cook with oil, not only does it leave behind an unpleasant smell in your kitchen, but it can also pollute your indoor air quality. The best way to prevent the smell is to choose an oil that has a neutral flavor, like vegetable oil. However, you should also keep in mind that many oils come with a long list of chemicals that can pollute your indoor air quality when used for cooking. That’s why it pays to choose natural oils like coconut oil or olive oil instead.

    • Avoid the microwave

    While the microwave is convenient and easy to use, it also releases some chemicals into the air while it’s in use. That’s because most microwaves have a metal interior, and microwaving causes a reaction with the metals that emits fumes. This can affect your indoor air quality if you’re frequently using your microwave or cooking large meals for extended periods of time. Try to limit the number of times you use your microwave per day. Alternatively, you can choose to stop using it altogether and use a stovetop or oven instead.

    • Add a draft guard to your doors

    The most common source of air leaks indoors is at the bottom of doorways, where warm air escapes and cool air comes in. Even if you don’t notice any obvious drafts, make sure to check for energy loss around your door by spreading some flour on the floor near the base of it. If you see a lot of dust, this is most likely an air leak and it’s most likely allowing air and pollutants to enter your home. To fix the problem, add a draft guard like a doorstop or block of wood.

    • Choose houseplants wisely

    Houseplants not only add a pop of color to your home, but they can also clean the air in your home – although not all houseplants are created equal when it comes to purifying the air quality. According to NASA’s Clean Air Study, golden pothos and philodendron are two of the best plants for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from your indoor air. Other houseplants can be used to remove benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, and xylene from the air – all common indoor air pollutants that affect your health on a daily basis.

    • Take advantage of daylight

    During the day, expose as much of your home to natural light as possible by opening up blinds and curtains. This is one of the best ways to improve the air quality in your home because it allows fresh air to circulate indoors, which will increase air circulation and decrease humidity. Consider installing skylights in your home that allow you to take advantage of natural light without opening up blinds and curtains.

    • Reduce the allergens in your house

    Houseplants aren’t the only way to improve indoor air quality. Indoor pollutants can also originate from common items like household pets, smoke from the fireplace, or allergens carried in from outside. When the dust settles on your furniture, carpets, and floors, it can affect your indoor air quality by releasing allergens into the air every time you sit down or step onto a surface. To prevent this, keep your home free of large quantities of dust and minimize rugs throughout your house.

    There are many ways to improve your home’s air quality, and the first step is reducing the number of pollutants that enter your home from outside. But what many people don’t realize is that there are also a lot of common household items that contribute to poor indoor air quality as well, like oil-based paint or synthetic carpets. If you have any of these items in your home, you can improve your indoor air quality by simply removing them. After that, there are a number of other ways to do so as well – from increasing ventilation and sunlight to choosing the right houseplants or reducing dust. Every step helps your health and the health of those around you!